ZThemes

nerdwegian:

torakowalski:

throneroom-of-the-damned:

this is very important

link to watch it online

The Losers is *so good.* Everyone here’s seen it, right? I’ll feel like I’ve failed you, if not.

Everyone should watch The Losers. And then write lots and lots and lots of fic.

(Source: fortress-of-the-damned)

heisenfox:

If you’re not watching Sirens on Thursday nights at 10pm on USA, then you’re missing out. Not only is it one of the funniest shows out there right now — being that it’s co-created and executive produced by Denis Leary — but it’s also highly inclusive.

It centers on a team of Chicago EMTs, and focuses on the odd partnership of three men, Brian, who is the new guy, Johnny, a guy with a slow developing emotional range, and Hank, an African-American homosexual who defies all stereotypes the rest of popular media inflicts upon gay men. Their team is fleshed out in Cash, Voodoo, and Stats. And last night’s episode showed that Voodoo is asexual.

It took Brian from confusion and denail, to attempts to understand, and eventually wrapped it all around in a bow of acceptance. Brian went from the ideology that asexuals “just haven’t had proper sex,” to wanting to understand what asexual means — and failing — and finally all the way to realizing that sex isn’t what defines relationships, and that just being around Voodoo is enough for him.

Do yourselves a favor, and catch up on the episodes, and start tuning in Thursdays at 10.

(Source: westwingman)

falconwhitaker: Hi there :) Do you by any chance have a list of books about autistic characters by autistic authors?

diversityinya:

Hi! After doing some research, it’s pretty clear that there are very few young adult books that fit these parameters. Here are the few that we found:

Colin Fischer by Ashley Edward Miller and Zack Stentz (Penguin) — Zack Stentz “describes himself as ‘on the Asperger’s spectrum’” (NPR). 

"The screenwriting team behind X-Men: First Class and Thor make their YA debut with the story of a teenager with Asperger’s syndrome solving a crime, a premise that can’t help evoking Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. … readers will be drawn into the mystery and intrigued by Colin’s vision of the world." — Publishers Weekly 

Rogue by Lyn Miller-Lachmann (Nancy Paulsen Books) — Lyn Miller-Lachmann writes about being “on the autism spectrum” here for DiYA.

"An eighth-grader’s Asperger’s syndrome complicates her navigation of an unpredictable—and often inexplicable—world. … An interesting and somewhat enlightening look at a girl struggling but sometimes making bumpy progress in dealing with Asperger’s." — Kirkus

Also, Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis (Amulet Books), which comes out on June 17, 2014, fits these parameters.

Thanks to Corinne Duyvis and Lyn Miller-Lachmann for their input.

starexorcist:

evaupallnight:

torisugari-no-kamen-rider:

kamuicosplay:

Do you also want to create ALL THE ARMOR? I’ve released a book! 
5$ and I’ll teach you everything you need to know! :)

ORDER IT NOW!

Learning how to make armor from the grand prize winner at this year’s Blizzcon?  oh hell yes.

Oh my god, I’ll totally buy it.

oh…

Movies to look forward to in 2014 →

toblackgirls:

a.k.a This should have been posted at the start of the month not halfway through at the end of the month, but c’est la vie.

1. Belle (June 2014)

image

What is it about?

Belle is based on the life of a historical character, Dido Elizabeth Belle, the mixed–race daughter…

missgingerlee:

queenofthewest:

fromxoch:

Seriously about to watch all these movies. It’s my goal this year.

Poor Leo. Poor, poor Leo.

(Source: lordgodcaprio)

leo

prozacpark:

danceanthems:

this is just a general notice that if you haven’t read the the msscribe story or the cassandra clare plagiarism debacle on bad_penny, you are really missing out on the depths of the TRULY ridiculous in fandom history.

The msscribe story has to be the most awesomely entertaining wank report in the history of fandom EVER.  Like, I stopped reading wank reports after that because nothing will ever live up to that. 

(Source: meowsica)

kiokushitaka:

curiousercreature:

letsallnukethewhales:

madlori:

nevver:

The alphabet fades away

Would you like to read a book in which this happens?
It’s one of my all-time favorite books.  It’s called Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn.  He describes it as an “progressively lipogrammatic epistolary fable.”
It is written in the form of letters between the citizens of the fictional island of Nollop, an independent nation off the coast of South Carolina and home of Nevin Nollop, who invented the phrase “the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.”  That phrase is written in tiles over a statue of Nollop in their town square, and when one night a storm causes one of the tiles to fall, the council decides that it’s a sign from Nollop that they are no longer allowed to use that letter, in speech or writing, on pain of progressive punishments including public beating and up to banishment.
Then another tile falls.  Then another.
The citizens, who are all very attached to their words and writing, mount a campaign to come up with a phrase that uses all 26 letters but is shorter than Nollop’s, thus proving that he was not divine and negating all the edicts.
Because the novel is told in the form of letters the citizens write, and this is the genius part…the author must also stop using the letters as they fall.  So the book gradually stops using letters until at one point I think they’re down to just five.
The resolution literally made me get up and dance around the room.
It’s clever, creative, and a not-really-veiled-at-all parable about monotheistic oligarchy.  It’s not a long book, you can read it in an afternoon.
GO READ IT RIGHT NOW.

WOW I want to read that book

Very rarely is there a book that I must read at any costThis is now one of them


my coworker was JUST telling me about this book…

kiokushitaka:

curiousercreature:

letsallnukethewhales:

madlori:

nevver:

The alphabet fades away

Would you like to read a book in which this happens?

It’s one of my all-time favorite books.  It’s called Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn.  He describes it as an “progressively lipogrammatic epistolary fable.”

It is written in the form of letters between the citizens of the fictional island of Nollop, an independent nation off the coast of South Carolina and home of Nevin Nollop, who invented the phrase “the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.”  That phrase is written in tiles over a statue of Nollop in their town square, and when one night a storm causes one of the tiles to fall, the council decides that it’s a sign from Nollop that they are no longer allowed to use that letter, in speech or writing, on pain of progressive punishments including public beating and up to banishment.

Then another tile falls.  Then another.

The citizens, who are all very attached to their words and writing, mount a campaign to come up with a phrase that uses all 26 letters but is shorter than Nollop’s, thus proving that he was not divine and negating all the edicts.

Because the novel is told in the form of letters the citizens write, and this is the genius part…the author must also stop using the letters as they fall.  So the book gradually stops using letters until at one point I think they’re down to just five.

The resolution literally made me get up and dance around the room.

It’s clever, creative, and a not-really-veiled-at-all parable about monotheistic oligarchy.  It’s not a long book, you can read it in an afternoon.

GO READ IT RIGHT NOW.

WOW I want to read that book

Very rarely is there a book that I must read at any cost
This is now one of them

my coworker was JUST telling me about this book…

brynnreviewsya:

Delia Sherman’s story of Neef, a mortal changeling who lives in the fantastical world of “New York Between,” presents itself in exactly the whimsical fashion a book set in a world of mythological, fictional, and imaginary creatures of all cultures should. The young protagonist and heroine herself in Changeling is ordinary, save for the fact that she’s the only mortal in Central Park, which makes her all the more believable amidst a whirlwind of creatures both helpful and dangerous.

Spoiler warning.

Neef’s double, the fairy changeling left in her place in the mortal world, even joins in on her quest. Her habits and mannerisms are strongly reminiscent of an autistic child’s, though we’re given no real explanation for why she acts the way she does. Still, she provides a central character with whom autistic and neurodivergent readers of the series might relate.

End spoiler warning.

Though I found the book somewhat lacking in POC, save for a handful among the creatures Neef encounters and the mention of one mortal character, their presence at all puts this book above many other, more white-washed fantasy novels. Sherman does seem to draw on more than simply white cultures for the creatures in the novel, and there is no shortage of diverse female characters.

Slightly above average in representation and reasonably well-written, Delia Sherman’s Changeling is a decent, quick read for those looking to break up the monotony some in their YA consumption.